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Showing posts from 2010

Go beyond your limits

Awesome life example from Bruce Lee: Bruce had me up to three miles a day, really at a good pace. We’d run the three miles in twenty-one or twenty-two minutes. Just under eight minutes a mile [Note: when running on his own in 1968, Lee would get his time down to six-and-a half minutes per mile]. So this morning he said to me “We’re going to go five.” I said, “Bruce, I can’t go five. I’m a helluva lot older than you are, and I can’t do five.” He said, “When we get to three, we’ll shift gears and it’s only two more and you’ll do it.” I said “Okay, hell, I’ll go for it.” So we get to three, we go into the fourth mile and I’m okay for three or four minutes, and then I really begin to give out. I’m tired, my heart’s pounding, I can’t go any more and so I say to him, “Bruce if I run any more,” —and we’re still running-“if I run any more I’m liable to have a heart attack and die.” He said, “Then die.” It made me so mad that I went the full five miles. Afterward I went to the shower and then

converting videos with ffmpeg

I had to work on some video conversion and I found a good post from the Linux Journal on commands and tips for converting videos. http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/8517 A command example: ffmpeg -i eSeetrackFlash.flv -b 20000k -s 896x536 target_0.7.avi explanation to be continued

Nexus one tethering with ubuntu 9.10

Need to Tether from Nexus One to ubuntu? I followed the steps in this blog: http://www.asgrim.com/2009/07/24/tethering-your-htc-magic-android-phone-in-ubuntu-9-04-jaunty-jackalope/ and I can use my 3G cell connection from the nexus one to ubuntu 9.10. Presented on the blog are the steps for the HTC Magic, so configuring adb for the nexus one is slightly different: I edited udev permissions and created a new file: # /etc/udev/rules.d/99-android.rules SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="18d1", SYMLINK+="android_adb", MODE="0666" # sudo restart udev # adb devices List of devices attached HT036P901270 device Here's a screenshot of the speed I get with FIDO:

Just learned about rsync

I just learned about the rsync command which is amazingly useful. I have been using scp to copy folders from one machine at home to a machine in the lab back and forth and so far it's been good, and dead simple, but always involved extra work like making moving directories around. Now that I learned rsync, I can simply back up my work from the lab to my machine and vice versa using a simple command. Here is the command I use: rsync --delete -ravuzn -delete-excluded --exclude=*~ --rsh=ssh ~/work/ david@server.at.work.com:~/work/ and then, (notice I remove the n flag) rsync --delete -ravuz -delete-excluded --exclude=*~ --rsh=ssh ~/work/ david@server.at.work.com:~/work/ so what does this command do: flags: --delete: if I have removed files from my local computer, they are also deleted on the server r: recursively go through the folders and subfolders a: archive v: verbose mode u: update z: compress files --delete-excluded: deletes excluded files passed as parameter (next flag)